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January 18 2018

16:42

LDAP based UDP reflection attacks increase throughout 2017

There have been reports that UDP reflection DDoS attacks based on LDAP (aka CLDAP) have been increasing in recent months. Our network of UDP honeypots (described previously) confirms that this is the case. We estimate there are around 6000 attacks per day using this method. Our estimated number of attacks has risen fairly linearly from almost none at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018.
Number of attacks rises linearly from 0 at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018

Over the period where Netlab observed 304,146 attacks (365 days up to 2017-11-01) we observed 596,534 attacks. This may be due to detecting smaller attacks or overcounting due to attacks on IP prefixes.

The data behind this analysis is part of the Cambridge Cybercrime Centre’s catalogue of data available to academic researchers.

January 03 2018

14:02

What Goes Around Comes Around

What Goes Around Comes Around is a chapter I wrote for a book by EPIC. What are America’s long-term national policy interests (and ours for that matter) in surveillance and privacy? The election of a president with a very short-term view makes this ever more important.

While Britain was top dog in the 19th century, we gave the world both technology (steamships, railways, telegraphs) and values (the abolition of slavery and child labour, not to mention universal education). America has given us the motor car, the Internet, and a rules-based international trading system – and may have perhaps one generation left in which to make a difference.

Lessig taught us that code is law. Similarly, architecture is policy. The architecture of the Internet, and the moral norms embedded in it, will be a huge part of America’s legacy, and the network effects that dominate the information industries could give that architecture great longevity.

So if America re-engineers the Internet so that US firms can microtarget foreign customers cheaply, so that US telcos can extract rents from foreign firms via service quality, and so that the NSA can more easily spy on people in places like Pakistan and Yemen, then in 50 years’ time the Chinese will use it to manipulate, tax and snoop on Americans. In 100 years’ time it might be India in pole position, and in 200 years the United States of Africa.

My book chapter explores this topic. What do the architecture of the Internet, and the network effects of the information industries, mean for politics in the longer term, and for human rights? Although the chapter appeared in 2015, I forgot to put it online at the time. So here it is now.

December 28 2017

14:33

IDAPython: namespacing for plugins, loaders & processor modules.

Intended audience

IDAPython plugins, loaders or processor modules developers.

The problem

Until now, IDAPython would load all loaders, processor modules & plugins in the '__main__' module.

This causes namespace pollution, which can sometimes leads to very obscure errors.

The solution

Starting with version 7.1, IDA will import plugins, loaders & processor modules in their own, separate Python modules.

The names of those Python modules is derived from the plugin, loader or processor module’s file name.

E.g.,

  • a plugin named myplg.py will now be imported into its own '__plugins__myplg' Python module.
  • a loader named myldr.py will now be imported into its own '__loaders__myldr' Python module.
  • a processor module named myprc.py will now be imported into its own '__procs__myprc' Python module.

My plugin/loader/processor module complains about unexisting variables/functions!

It very likely means that the code in question was, in effect, relying on some other code being loaded before it, and that was “polluting” the '__main__' module in a way that was very fortunate from its point-of-view (a happy coincidence, if you will.)

The solution is of course to fix the code in question so that it imports everything it needs, before making use of it.

However…

I’m in a hurry

As a temporary workaround, you can set NAMESPACE_AWARE to NO in cfg/python.cfg.

This will cause IDA to revert to the old behavior, where the '__main__' module is shared across all plugins, loaders, processor modules & user scripts.

However, please note that support for NAMESPACE_AWARE will be removed sometimes in the future.

December 04 2017

11:59

End of privacy rights in the UK public sector?

There has already been serious controversy about the “Henry VIII” powers in the Brexit Bill, which will enable ministers to rewrite laws at their discretion as we leave the EU. Now Theresa May’s government has sneaked a new “Framework for data processing in government” into the Lords committee stage of the new Data Protection Bill (see pages 99-101, which are pp 111–3 of the pdf). It will enable ministers to promulgate a Henry VIII privacy regulation with quite extraordinary properties.

It will cover all data held by any public body including the NHS (175(1)), be outside of the ICO’s jurisdiction (178(5)) and that of any tribunal (178(2)) including Judicial Review (175(4), 176(7)), wider human-rights law (178(2,3,4)), and international jurisdictions – although ministers are supposed to change it if they notice that it breaks any international treaty obligation (177(4)).

In fact it will be changeable on a whim by Ministers (175(4)), have no effective Parliamentary oversight (175(6)), and apply retroactively (178(3)). It will also provide an automatic statutory defence for any data processing in any Government decision taken to any tribunal/court 178(4)).

Ministers have had frequent fights in the past over personal data in the public sector, most frequently over medical records which they have sold, again and again, to drug companies and others in defiance not just of UK law, EU law and human-rights law, but of the express wishes of patients, articulated by opting out of data “sharing”. In fact, we have to thank MedConfidential for being the first to notice the latest data grab. Their briefing gives more details are sets out the amendments we need to press for in Parliament. This is not the only awful thing about the bill by any means; its section 164 will be terrible news for journalists. This is one of those times when you need to write to your MP. Please do it now!

January 18 2018

16:42

LDAP based UDP reflection attacks increase throughout 2017

There have been reports that UDP reflection DDoS attacks based on LDAP (aka CLDAP) have been increasing in recent months. Our network of UDP honeypots (described previously) confirms that this is the case. We estimate there are around 6000 attacks per day using this method. Our estimated number of attacks has risen fairly linearly from almost none at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018.
Number of attacks rises linearly from 0 at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018

Over the period where Netlab observed 304,146 attacks (365 days up to 2017-11-01) we observed 596,534 attacks. This may be due to detecting smaller attacks or overcounting due to attacks on IP prefixes.

The data behind this analysis is part of the Cambridge Cybercrime Centre’s catalogue of data available to academic researchers.

January 03 2018

14:02

What Goes Around Comes Around

What Goes Around Comes Around is a chapter I wrote for a book by EPIC. What are America’s long-term national policy interests (and ours for that matter) in surveillance and privacy? The election of a president with a very short-term view makes this ever more important.

While Britain was top dog in the 19th century, we gave the world both technology (steamships, railways, telegraphs) and values (the abolition of slavery and child labour, not to mention universal education). America has given us the motor car, the Internet, and a rules-based international trading system – and may have perhaps one generation left in which to make a difference.

Lessig taught us that code is law. Similarly, architecture is policy. The architecture of the Internet, and the moral norms embedded in it, will be a huge part of America’s legacy, and the network effects that dominate the information industries could give that architecture great longevity.

So if America re-engineers the Internet so that US firms can microtarget foreign customers cheaply, so that US telcos can extract rents from foreign firms via service quality, and so that the NSA can more easily spy on people in places like Pakistan and Yemen, then in 50 years’ time the Chinese will use it to manipulate, tax and snoop on Americans. In 100 years’ time it might be India in pole position, and in 200 years the United States of Africa.

My book chapter explores this topic. What do the architecture of the Internet, and the network effects of the information industries, mean for politics in the longer term, and for human rights? Although the chapter appeared in 2015, I forgot to put it online at the time. So here it is now.

December 28 2017

14:33

IDAPython: namespacing for plugins, loaders & processor modules.

Intended audience

IDAPython plugins, loaders or processor modules developers.

The problem

Until now, IDAPython would load all loaders, processor modules & plugins in the '__main__' module.

This causes namespace pollution, which can sometimes leads to very obscure errors.

The solution

Starting with version 7.1, IDA will import plugins, loaders & processor modules in their own, separate Python modules.

The names of those Python modules is derived from the plugin, loader or processor module’s file name.

E.g.,

  • a plugin named myplg.py will now be imported into its own '__plugins__myplg' Python module.
  • a loader named myldr.py will now be imported into its own '__loaders__myldr' Python module.
  • a processor module named myprc.py will now be imported into its own '__procs__myprc' Python module.

My plugin/loader/processor module complains about unexisting variables/functions!

It very likely means that the code in question was, in effect, relying on some other code being loaded before it, and that was “polluting” the '__main__' module in a way that was very fortunate from its point-of-view (a happy coincidence, if you will.)

The solution is of course to fix the code in question so that it imports everything it needs, before making use of it.

However…

I’m in a hurry

As a temporary workaround, you can set NAMESPACE_AWARE to NO in cfg/python.cfg.

This will cause IDA to revert to the old behavior, where the '__main__' module is shared across all plugins, loaders, processor modules & user scripts.

However, please note that support for NAMESPACE_AWARE will be removed sometimes in the future.

January 18 2018

16:42

LDAP based UDP reflection attacks increase throughout 2017

There have been reports that UDP reflection DDoS attacks based on LDAP (aka CLDAP) have been increasing in recent months. Our network of UDP honeypots (described previously) confirms that this is the case. We estimate there are around 6000 attacks per day using this method. Our estimated number of attacks has risen fairly linearly from almost none at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018.
Number of attacks rises linearly from 0 at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018

Over the period where Netlab observed 304,146 attacks (365 days up to 2017-11-01) we observed 596,534 attacks. This may be due to detecting smaller attacks or overcounting due to attacks on IP prefixes.

The data behind this analysis is part of the Cambridge Cybercrime Centre’s catalogue of data available to academic researchers.

January 03 2018

14:02

What Goes Around Comes Around

What Goes Around Comes Around is a chapter I wrote for a book by EPIC. What are America’s long-term national policy interests (and ours for that matter) in surveillance and privacy? The election of a president with a very short-term view makes this ever more important.

While Britain was top dog in the 19th century, we gave the world both technology (steamships, railways, telegraphs) and values (the abolition of slavery and child labour, not to mention universal education). America has given us the motor car, the Internet, and a rules-based international trading system – and may have perhaps one generation left in which to make a difference.

Lessig taught us that code is law. Similarly, architecture is policy. The architecture of the Internet, and the moral norms embedded in it, will be a huge part of America’s legacy, and the network effects that dominate the information industries could give that architecture great longevity.

So if America re-engineers the Internet so that US firms can microtarget foreign customers cheaply, so that US telcos can extract rents from foreign firms via service quality, and so that the NSA can more easily spy on people in places like Pakistan and Yemen, then in 50 years’ time the Chinese will use it to manipulate, tax and snoop on Americans. In 100 years’ time it might be India in pole position, and in 200 years the United States of Africa.

My book chapter explores this topic. What do the architecture of the Internet, and the network effects of the information industries, mean for politics in the longer term, and for human rights? Although the chapter appeared in 2015, I forgot to put it online at the time. So here it is now.

January 18 2018

16:42

LDAP based UDP reflection attacks increase throughout 2017

There have been reports that UDP reflection DDoS attacks based on LDAP (aka CLDAP) have been increasing in recent months. Our network of UDP honeypots (described previously) confirms that this is the case. We estimate there are around 6000 attacks per day using this method. Our estimated number of attacks has risen fairly linearly from almost none at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018.
Number of attacks rises linearly from 0 at the beginning of 2017 to 5000-7000 per day at the beginning of 2018

Over the period where Netlab observed 304,146 attacks (365 days up to 2017-11-01) we observed 596,534 attacks. This may be due to detecting smaller attacks or overcounting due to attacks on IP prefixes.

The data behind this analysis is part of the Cambridge Cybercrime Centre’s catalogue of data available to academic researchers.

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